Gertie’s Garden Diary, The Merry Month of May … May’s End, 2019.

Gertie’s Garden Diary, The Merry Month of May …
May’s End, 2019.


During the rest of May I have been particularly fascinated by the numbers of bees busily buzzing around tiny blossoms in particular, like those on the Cotoneaster Horizontalis ‘Variegatus’ in particular

Other flowers have bloomed and taken over from the earlier displays of Tulips [long gone] and then, the last, fascinating few Irises …[can you see the ‘Elf’?]


There is lots of colour in the garden, which I like.




The colours of the Feverfew flowers I still find quite mysterious … green petals!

There is beautiful white in many places too ….. climbing roses in the old Firethorn Tree, Pyracantha, filled with fluffy, creamy blossoms …




… and yellow Roses with a beautiful scent.

A Foxglove from somewhere in Lincolnshire blooms behind Blue Hill.

Massed pink roses on leggy, prickly stems need taming …

Peace is blossoming high [too high!] …..

… and Dame de Court has started to bloom as well.

From the balcony the new vegetable plot, a sunny back room, is filling with potatoes and sprouting greens, and I will have to make room by moving out some of the edging plants and by rehoming the Rhubarb.

Baby Sunflowers ‘Teddy’ and new, blue-flowering seedlings, [Aquilegias and Morning Glory ]both from seeds sent by good, gardening friends, have been potted on, or planted strategically on Blue Hill …


… and on the cleared corner bed , where the Morning Glory can drape over the edge and cover the old, concrete wall.

At last pink Clematis has come into bloom: insects love it.

There are some problems rearing ‘ugly heads’. I had rust in one of the Bellis plants so took out all the affected stems and leaves. I still have raging ‘Black Spot’ on many of the roses. Dame de Court and Peace are too leggy and I will have to bite the bullet and hard prune after flowering. Someone advised me to cut down by two thirds at the end of this season, and another third at the end of the following year. I don’t want to lose these old beauties but am preparing myself for the possibility.
As usual, the Ribe came back with fast growth all with the usual Powdery Mildew, so that was cut out PDQ; and I have a wild Cherry tree growing from the roots of the beautiful old white one that I lost, and that I shall cut down too, before it reaches a size that requires permission to do so!
I wonder if the advancement of the mildew/rust-type diseases is a result of too many plants, growing too close together? I won’t use chemical preparations as I don’t wish to harm the insects and other wild critters around GGTardis. I will allow myself the occasional weak detergent/ water spray mix on some infestations of greenfly though.
Sadly, but two of my beautiful beans have germinated, first time that this has ever happened, but these two are growing well, and will be planted in their usual place in the front garden when the weather is warm enough.

It is fun to see this Clematis Jackmanii climbing up behind Dom’s shed, as well as another going up high into the Holly tree 

And I think that I have another healthy white Campanula cutting for a Gardening friend in N. Ireland.

So, roll on June and let’s see what’s next … a bit more rain I hope!
Heucheras have been splendid all month

Walking back from sheds along path towards the Holly Tree …

… Look back; it’s a jungle! … [ I have since trimmed around the path!]



A big ‘thank you’ to friends who have sent seeds xxxxx

Anne ….. end of May, 2019.

 

6 Responses

  1. Len says:

    great photos anne. :good:

  2. gertie says:

    Thank you Len :-) this was all before the second arch I mentioned, which holds the pink roses :rose:

  3. It looks glorious, Anne and a mega credit to a small space! It doesn’t look like a small space but you insist it is :lol: And of course, if you’re attracting insects, you’re doing the right thing :rose:

    • gertie says:

      :lol: Thanks Jane. :rose:
      It’s three little rooms in a row Jane and so filled that I can’t squeeze in much more [would love a Bramley apple tree for example] without getting rid of something else. I find it hard enough cutting back and pruning , without killing off something just because it doesn’t fit my plans! ;-)

  4. cilla says:

    It is quite amazing Anne, you are obviously doing something very right it is such a blaze of colour and different leaf combinations. It must give you great pleasure every time you look at it and great to be able to see it all from upstairs..I miss that in a bungalow. Just fabulous :-)

  5. gertie says:

    Thanks Cilla. Am glad that you like the leaf mixes too … I am so impressed by leaves: They are every bit as attractive as flowers to look att and I am beginning to learn of how hard they work to keep the whole plant itself alive and well and continuing … for example how they feed bulbs for the next season after blooming etc. … will try a few roof views to show you and Jane too. :lol: :rose:

Leave a Reply

Loading...