Growing Fruit

Compost for strawbs

This topic contains 11 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by  NorthernTeacher 4 months, 1 week ago.

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  • #56363

    NorthernTeacher
    Participant

    I’ve just been reading that strawbs really like ericaceous compost. Do any clickers use this for their strawberries? I overbought for my blueberry bushes and will use some if recommended by anyone.

    #56364

    Beanstew
    Participant

    I felt impelled to look this up on reading your question, Jane – and it looks as though your information is correct. The plant prefers a PH of 5.5 – 6.5, and the fact that I’ve never had to consider it, is probably due to the fact that most of the soils I’ve gardened on are slightly acidic.

    #56365

    NorthernTeacher
    Participant

    Your in the land of heather-growing, Sheila and so your strawberries should apparently be even more delicious! I’m going to leave the raised bed as it is and do a comparison and repot the ones in single pots.

    #56366

    cilla
    Participant

    That is interesting Jane. I stopped growing strawbs because they took over but I bought a salad container for 20p last year and when I opened it out it is really long so I could grow some in there :good:

    #56367

    NorthernTeacher
    Participant

    Definitely worth growing, Cilla – especially for breakfast :good:

    #56418

    VegVamp
    Keymaster

    Like Sheila, my soil is slightly acidic Jane, and strawberries do well, so thank you for the info. ;-) :good:

    #56425

    NorthernTeacher
    Participant

    I’ve just read this, Karen “Plant geeks in Ireland have demonstrated that strawberry plants grown on acidic soils with high potassium content yield fruit with measurably better flavour” here :good:
    https://www.telegraph.co.uk/gardening/how-to-grow/james-wong-how-to-grow-the-best-tasting-strawberries/

    #56426

    VegVamp
    Keymaster

    Well there you go Jane, though pure fluke on my part. :lol: Certainly the ones you buy are pretty disgusting in comparison to home grown – like everything else. ;-)

    #56429

    Beanstew
    Participant

    Think you also need to bear in mind that strawberries are bred for different characteristics, and that plant breeders are trying to please the big plant purchasers i.e commercial growers, who grow for shelf life and yield, and not necessarily for flavour. Win-win is growing Mara des Bois in an acidic soil – but you will never find that variety in a punnet in a shop. It doesn’t produce enough – but it’s sublime.

    #56430

    NorthernTeacher
    Participant

    I had those last year, Sheila and chucked them out as they didn’t do well but I will get more next year and grow them in the correct compost. Thanks for the reminder.

    #56437

    Yewbarrow
    Participant

    useful tip there, did not know at all, have sort of changed my soil – we are a limestone area – wanted to grow camelias and things like that so have been able to up the acidic content of soil over the last 35 years, own compost is on the acidic side (on purpose if that makes sense)

    #56438

    NorthernTeacher
    Participant

    Definitely, Jenny :lol:

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