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VegVamp

Got back into growing veg, fruit, herbs in 2008, after I moved home in 2001 and finally had a garden big enough again to put in a veg plot. Now in year 6 of my veg growing and we are more or less self sufficient in potatoes, veg and some fruit! Love it!

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Duncan

Rather ironically, doesn't like gardening.

Site Moderators

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Hayley
I am a keen vegetable and flower gardener using organic techniques as much as possible. Having moved to the country, and discovered the abundant wildlife in my garden, I am finding ways to work alongside all the animals and insects here. My vegetable garden at present is a small north facing area adjacent to the house which has been quite successful. The soil generally is heavy clay which, over the years, has been improved with organic matter. I have created a fruit orchard with a flower meadow running through it and I need to decide how best to help the natural pond restore it's vigour. Ducks and Moorhens are regular visitors as is the inevitable duck weed! There is still much to do in this 2.25acres but it's work in progress and a legacy for someone in the future to develop further. I have always only felt a custodian of this garden and try to preserve it's beautiful, magical character.
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gonewest
As far as gardening goes we've gone from London postage stamp to a fairly large (but not huge) mature country garden. We are lucky enough to have a river at the bottom of the garden which means the ground is never parched. Of course in years like the past two (2011/2012) it can mean that it bursts its banks once in a while, but we are fortunate that it's never too bad for us. We also have a very mature weeping willow tree and an alder down by the river, and there are more similar on the opposite bank which drink up the excess water very fast so it comes and goes within a few hours. We have a range of wildlife visiting the garden, lots of birds which we love to watch and feed. We get considerably more variety of garden birds than we did in London, but these are added to by a few birds of prey, and of course the water birds from the river. We also have water voles courtesy of the river sometimes, but field voles are another thing - not so welcome as they ruin Mr G's lawn. Now we're not after a bowling green as such, but nor do we want the obvious runs and tunnels shapes appearing in different areas as we gradually move them around. We also see deer in the garden - muntjac and roe who are both even more noticeable in autumn when they want the apples from the two large trees we have. We are separated from our neighbours by mature mainly native trees and shrubs which give us our privacy, make the garden a little haven for us, and feed the birds and the bees. I've been doing my best to add to these as time goes on. 'Course I've gone and added a hazel, and after moaning about the field voles I go and encourage squirrels, but live and let live I suppose. There was nowhere set aside for growing vegetables but our patio is large and surrounds the house on 3 sides so one side has been given over to a couple of raised beds. I'm not a great expert, so I concentrate on things that are easy to grow but expensive in the shops like runner beans and strawberries, with a few other little treats thrown in. I've also added a few patio fruit trees on the same basis. I love summer fruits so have a little apricot called Alfred, two cherries - one dessert, one cooking, and a quince having been introduced to them since we moved here, such a special fruit. They are all only babies yet, though the cherries look as though they'll reward me straight away. The garden also has a mature grapevine which has been a steep curve learning to look after it. I made raisins from it a couple of years ago before the "great rains" that stopped pollinators in their tracks. I also like to grow some herbs too, some good basic ones like rosemary and sage, chives, mint etc, plus a few more like hyssop and savory. And something associated to this line, I have discovered scented pelargoniums. At first I had to buy new each year, but from gratefully received members' info on the Dear Departed, and after a couple of mishaps I learned how to overwinter. The first year I wrapped and covered with bubble wrap in my cold greenhouse. ERROR! Botrytis. The next year I decided to keep them indoors in the porch and the spare bedroom. Worked a lot better, saved some, but should have cut others back a bit further to reduce the amount of growth the dormant plants had to support. Still a bit scaredy cat about cutting back, however this last year all of them survived, plus some cuttings taken for insurance. I'm no expert on anything, but I love this little community of ours and with a bit of trial and error, plus information from our more experienced and even expert members I will and do make progress.
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Allan
Update March 2017 I have been without my plot for two years now but still have the urge to grow things.  So my back garden gets all my attention now, It seems strange not starting onions off on Boxing Day, I still grow leeks, but not for show anymore. There are six raised beds in all. One for my runner beans, which the soil gets changed in every year. One for peas and broad beans, another for leeks, shallots and parsley. The biggest one then is for my chrysanths. The shaded one has a collection of herbs, Three blueberry bushes, a thornless blackberry, and a goji berry bush, trimmed down too one stem. The narrow side of the garden has a Victoria plum, numerous shrubs, and a collection of hardy fuchsias. This year it will be under planted with loads of bedding plants, that I started off in February. Between that, my fishing and metal detecting  I have enough to keep me busy.

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Group Administrators

Attracting wildlife

For all those interested in encouraging beneficial wildlife

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Hayley
I am a keen vegetable and flower gardener using organic techniques as much as possible. Having moved to the country, and discovered the abundant wildlife in my garden, I am finding ways to work alongside all the animals and insects here. My vegetable garden at present is a small north facing area adjacent to the house which has been quite successful. The soil generally is heavy clay which, over the years, has been improved with organic matter. I have created a fruit orchard with a flower meadow running through it and I need to decide how best to help the natural pond restore it's vigour. Ducks and Moorhens are regular visitors as is the inevitable duck weed! There is still much to do in this 2.25acres but it's work in progress and a legacy for someone in the future to develop further. I have always only felt a custodian of this garden and try to preserve it's beautiful, magical character.
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NorthernTeacher
Got my house and garden March 2011 and always learning. Love it. I call it my little copse as there are lots of trees and lots of wildlife. Space for some veg in the garden and in some purpose built raised beds. The thrushes help themselves to the slugs and snails here! And now it's 2015 and I have a pond!!
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gonewest
As far as gardening goes we've gone from London postage stamp to a fairly large (but not huge) mature country garden. We are lucky enough to have a river at the bottom of the garden which means the ground is never parched. Of course in years like the past two (2011/2012) it can mean that it bursts its banks once in a while, but we are fortunate that it's never too bad for us. We also have a very mature weeping willow tree and an alder down by the river, and there are more similar on the opposite bank which drink up the excess water very fast so it comes and goes within a few hours. We have a range of wildlife visiting the garden, lots of birds which we love to watch and feed. We get considerably more variety of garden birds than we did in London, but these are added to by a few birds of prey, and of course the water birds from the river. We also have water voles courtesy of the river sometimes, but field voles are another thing - not so welcome as they ruin Mr G's lawn. Now we're not after a bowling green as such, but nor do we want the obvious runs and tunnels shapes appearing in different areas as we gradually move them around. We also see deer in the garden - muntjac and roe who are both even more noticeable in autumn when they want the apples from the two large trees we have. We are separated from our neighbours by mature mainly native trees and shrubs which give us our privacy, make the garden a little haven for us, and feed the birds and the bees. I've been doing my best to add to these as time goes on. 'Course I've gone and added a hazel, and after moaning about the field voles I go and encourage squirrels, but live and let live I suppose. There was nowhere set aside for growing vegetables but our patio is large and surrounds the house on 3 sides so one side has been given over to a couple of raised beds. I'm not a great expert, so I concentrate on things that are easy to grow but expensive in the shops like runner beans and strawberries, with a few other little treats thrown in. I've also added a few patio fruit trees on the same basis. I love summer fruits so have a little apricot called Alfred, two cherries - one dessert, one cooking, and a quince having been introduced to them since we moved here, such a special fruit. They are all only babies yet, though the cherries look as though they'll reward me straight away. The garden also has a mature grapevine which has been a steep curve learning to look after it. I made raisins from it a couple of years ago before the "great rains" that stopped pollinators in their tracks. I also like to grow some herbs too, some good basic ones like rosemary and sage, chives, mint etc, plus a few more like hyssop and savory. And something associated to this line, I have discovered scented pelargoniums. At first I had to buy new each year, but from gratefully received members' info on the Dear Departed, and after a couple of mishaps I learned how to overwinter. The first year I wrapped and covered with bubble wrap in my cold greenhouse. ERROR! Botrytis. The next year I decided to keep them indoors in the porch and the spare bedroom. Worked a lot better, saved some, but should have cut others back a bit further to reduce the amount of growth the dormant plants had to support. Still a bit scaredy cat about cutting back, however this last year all of them survived, plus some cuttings taken for insurance. I'm no expert on anything, but I love this little community of ours and with a bit of trial and error, plus information from our more experienced and even expert members I will and do make progress.
Baking

Ambersparkle (Tina) thought this might be a good idea for a group, if there is sufficient interest we'll keep it going. She does a lot of baking so lots of hints and tips coming from her.

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Ambersparkle
Ooops, put the Gardening bit up Top. I have a biggish Greenhouse, where I grow in the Summer, Cucumbers, Tomatoes, Peppers, all the usual things. I have a tiny Pool, but the Birds love it. Been Gardening all my life, since following my Gran round with a tiny Trowel, she was a great, and wise old Bird, and taught me pretty much of what I know. I was eight, when War broke out, and we had to dig for Victory, that was the first Allottment. All Father did was dig it over, he was no Gardener, it was me and Nan, who did the Donkey work. So yes, have been up to my Neck in the mucky stuff most of my Life.
Bees

All about the buzzers!

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NorthernTeacher
Got my house and garden March 2011 and always learning. Love it. I call it my little copse as there are lots of trees and lots of wildlife. Space for some veg in the garden and in some purpose built raised beds. The thrushes help themselves to the slugs and snails here! And now it's 2015 and I have a pond!!
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Roemg

Roemg hasn't written anything here yet. :)

Bottling and Pickling

Storing the gluts through pickling and bottling. Recipes, methods, equipment, come and share what you do or learn how to get started.

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motherveggie

motherveggie hasn't written anything here yet. :)

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gonewest
As far as gardening goes we've gone from London postage stamp to a fairly large (but not huge) mature country garden. We are lucky enough to have a river at the bottom of the garden which means the ground is never parched. Of course in years like the past two (2011/2012) it can mean that it bursts its banks once in a while, but we are fortunate that it's never too bad for us. We also have a very mature weeping willow tree and an alder down by the river, and there are more similar on the opposite bank which drink up the excess water very fast so it comes and goes within a few hours. We have a range of wildlife visiting the garden, lots of birds which we love to watch and feed. We get considerably more variety of garden birds than we did in London, but these are added to by a few birds of prey, and of course the water birds from the river. We also have water voles courtesy of the river sometimes, but field voles are another thing - not so welcome as they ruin Mr G's lawn. Now we're not after a bowling green as such, but nor do we want the obvious runs and tunnels shapes appearing in different areas as we gradually move them around. We also see deer in the garden - muntjac and roe who are both even more noticeable in autumn when they want the apples from the two large trees we have. We are separated from our neighbours by mature mainly native trees and shrubs which give us our privacy, make the garden a little haven for us, and feed the birds and the bees. I've been doing my best to add to these as time goes on. 'Course I've gone and added a hazel, and after moaning about the field voles I go and encourage squirrels, but live and let live I suppose. There was nowhere set aside for growing vegetables but our patio is large and surrounds the house on 3 sides so one side has been given over to a couple of raised beds. I'm not a great expert, so I concentrate on things that are easy to grow but expensive in the shops like runner beans and strawberries, with a few other little treats thrown in. I've also added a few patio fruit trees on the same basis. I love summer fruits so have a little apricot called Alfred, two cherries - one dessert, one cooking, and a quince having been introduced to them since we moved here, such a special fruit. They are all only babies yet, though the cherries look as though they'll reward me straight away. The garden also has a mature grapevine which has been a steep curve learning to look after it. I made raisins from it a couple of years ago before the "great rains" that stopped pollinators in their tracks. I also like to grow some herbs too, some good basic ones like rosemary and sage, chives, mint etc, plus a few more like hyssop and savory. And something associated to this line, I have discovered scented pelargoniums. At first I had to buy new each year, but from gratefully received members' info on the Dear Departed, and after a couple of mishaps I learned how to overwinter. The first year I wrapped and covered with bubble wrap in my cold greenhouse. ERROR! Botrytis. The next year I decided to keep them indoors in the porch and the spare bedroom. Worked a lot better, saved some, but should have cut others back a bit further to reduce the amount of growth the dormant plants had to support. Still a bit scaredy cat about cutting back, however this last year all of them survived, plus some cuttings taken for insurance. I'm no expert on anything, but I love this little community of ours and with a bit of trial and error, plus information from our more experienced and even expert members I will and do make progress.
Composting

For those who already make their own, or would like to start

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VegVamp
Got back into growing veg, fruit, herbs in 2008, after I moved home in 2001 and finally had a garden big enough again to put in a veg plot. Now in year 6 of my veg growing and we are more or less self sufficient in potatoes, veg and some fruit! Love it!
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mickyp
veg , fruit & gladioli , plus an avid composter , am all raised beds & i dont dig ,,,,
Container gardening

Sometimes space is limited! Growing things in containers.

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gonewest
As far as gardening goes we've gone from London postage stamp to a fairly large (but not huge) mature country garden. We are lucky enough to have a river at the bottom of the garden which means the ground is never parched. Of course in years like the past two (2011/2012) it can mean that it bursts its banks once in a while, but we are fortunate that it's never too bad for us. We also have a very mature weeping willow tree and an alder down by the river, and there are more similar on the opposite bank which drink up the excess water very fast so it comes and goes within a few hours. We have a range of wildlife visiting the garden, lots of birds which we love to watch and feed. We get considerably more variety of garden birds than we did in London, but these are added to by a few birds of prey, and of course the water birds from the river. We also have water voles courtesy of the river sometimes, but field voles are another thing - not so welcome as they ruin Mr G's lawn. Now we're not after a bowling green as such, but nor do we want the obvious runs and tunnels shapes appearing in different areas as we gradually move them around. We also see deer in the garden - muntjac and roe who are both even more noticeable in autumn when they want the apples from the two large trees we have. We are separated from our neighbours by mature mainly native trees and shrubs which give us our privacy, make the garden a little haven for us, and feed the birds and the bees. I've been doing my best to add to these as time goes on. 'Course I've gone and added a hazel, and after moaning about the field voles I go and encourage squirrels, but live and let live I suppose. There was nowhere set aside for growing vegetables but our patio is large and surrounds the house on 3 sides so one side has been given over to a couple of raised beds. I'm not a great expert, so I concentrate on things that are easy to grow but expensive in the shops like runner beans and strawberries, with a few other little treats thrown in. I've also added a few patio fruit trees on the same basis. I love summer fruits so have a little apricot called Alfred, two cherries - one dessert, one cooking, and a quince having been introduced to them since we moved here, such a special fruit. They are all only babies yet, though the cherries look as though they'll reward me straight away. The garden also has a mature grapevine which has been a steep curve learning to look after it. I made raisins from it a couple of years ago before the "great rains" that stopped pollinators in their tracks. I also like to grow some herbs too, some good basic ones like rosemary and sage, chives, mint etc, plus a few more like hyssop and savory. And something associated to this line, I have discovered scented pelargoniums. At first I had to buy new each year, but from gratefully received members' info on the Dear Departed, and after a couple of mishaps I learned how to overwinter. The first year I wrapped and covered with bubble wrap in my cold greenhouse. ERROR! Botrytis. The next year I decided to keep them indoors in the porch and the spare bedroom. Worked a lot better, saved some, but should have cut others back a bit further to reduce the amount of growth the dormant plants had to support. Still a bit scaredy cat about cutting back, however this last year all of them survived, plus some cuttings taken for insurance. I'm no expert on anything, but I love this little community of ours and with a bit of trial and error, plus information from our more experienced and even expert members I will and do make progress.
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Roemg

Roemg hasn't written anything here yet. :)

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Beanstew
I am really interested in all aspects of gardening, with a particular love of propagation. This would be fine, but space is finite where I live now, and I am seriously considering some vertical gardening. My garden is mixed - I have trees, shrubs and herbacious planting, with an area for vegetables and fruit which is never big enough. Earlier in life, I grew enough for a family of five to be self-sufficient all year round in vegetables and fruit, and sometimes feel sad that this is no longer necessary. Changing weather patterns mean I am revising what I grow, and how I grow it - but that is part of the skill of being a gardener - ducking and diving to counteract adversity.
Design

For all those interested in designing gardens using soft (planting) and hard (paving, walling) landscaping

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VegVamp
Got back into growing veg, fruit, herbs in 2008, after I moved home in 2001 and finally had a garden big enough again to put in a veg plot. Now in year 6 of my veg growing and we are more or less self sufficient in potatoes, veg and some fruit! Love it!
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Miriam

Miriam hasn't written anything here yet. :)

Ex Servicemen and Women

A group for those who are ex service or are just interested. To share memories, photos, experiences of those who served their country.

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VegVamp
Got back into growing veg, fruit, herbs in 2008, after I moved home in 2001 and finally had a garden big enough again to put in a veg plot. Now in year 6 of my veg growing and we are more or less self sufficient in potatoes, veg and some fruit! Love it!
Profile Photo
Ambersparkle
Ooops, put the Gardening bit up Top. I have a biggish Greenhouse, where I grow in the Summer, Cucumbers, Tomatoes, Peppers, all the usual things. I have a tiny Pool, but the Birds love it. Been Gardening all my life, since following my Gran round with a tiny Trowel, she was a great, and wise old Bird, and taught me pretty much of what I know. I was eight, when War broke out, and we had to dig for Victory, that was the first Allottment. All Father did was dig it over, he was no Gardener, it was me and Nan, who did the Donkey work. So yes, have been up to my Neck in the mucky stuff most of my Life.
Floristry

Floral design/flower arranging, Making table decorations, garlands, wreaths and all sorts , for all those special occasions throughout the year. Using fresh flowers, foliage, dried flowers and what ever else comes to hand!

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bizzylizzy
grow veg and flowers on an allotment
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Hayley
I am a keen vegetable and flower gardener using organic techniques as much as possible. Having moved to the country, and discovered the abundant wildlife in my garden, I am finding ways to work alongside all the animals and insects here. My vegetable garden at present is a small north facing area adjacent to the house which has been quite successful. The soil generally is heavy clay which, over the years, has been improved with organic matter. I have created a fruit orchard with a flower meadow running through it and I need to decide how best to help the natural pond restore it's vigour. Ducks and Moorhens are regular visitors as is the inevitable duck weed! There is still much to do in this 2.25acres but it's work in progress and a legacy for someone in the future to develop further. I have always only felt a custodian of this garden and try to preserve it's beautiful, magical character.
Flower Growing

All about growing flowers, share your secrets and learn new ones!

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Hayley
I am a keen vegetable and flower gardener using organic techniques as much as possible. Having moved to the country, and discovered the abundant wildlife in my garden, I am finding ways to work alongside all the animals and insects here. My vegetable garden at present is a small north facing area adjacent to the house which has been quite successful. The soil generally is heavy clay which, over the years, has been improved with organic matter. I have created a fruit orchard with a flower meadow running through it and I need to decide how best to help the natural pond restore it's vigour. Ducks and Moorhens are regular visitors as is the inevitable duck weed! There is still much to do in this 2.25acres but it's work in progress and a legacy for someone in the future to develop further. I have always only felt a custodian of this garden and try to preserve it's beautiful, magical character.
Greenhouses, coldframes, tunnels

Under cover gardening

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Allan
Update March 2017 I have been without my plot for two years now but still have the urge to grow things.  So my back garden gets all my attention now, It seems strange not starting onions off on Boxing Day, I still grow leeks, but not for show anymore. There are six raised beds in all. One for my runner beans, which the soil gets changed in every year. One for peas and broad beans, another for leeks, shallots and parsley. The biggest one then is for my chrysanths. The shaded one has a collection of herbs, Three blueberry bushes, a thornless blackberry, and a goji berry bush, trimmed down too one stem. The narrow side of the garden has a Victoria plum, numerous shrubs, and a collection of hardy fuchsias. This year it will be under planted with loads of bedding plants, that I started off in February. Between that, my fishing and metal detecting  I have enough to keep me busy.
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mickyp
veg , fruit & gladioli , plus an avid composter , am all raised beds & i dont dig ,,,,
Growing and using Herbs

For all those interested in growing and using medicinal and culinary herbs.

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Hayley
I am a keen vegetable and flower gardener using organic techniques as much as possible. Having moved to the country, and discovered the abundant wildlife in my garden, I am finding ways to work alongside all the animals and insects here. My vegetable garden at present is a small north facing area adjacent to the house which has been quite successful. The soil generally is heavy clay which, over the years, has been improved with organic matter. I have created a fruit orchard with a flower meadow running through it and I need to decide how best to help the natural pond restore it's vigour. Ducks and Moorhens are regular visitors as is the inevitable duck weed! There is still much to do in this 2.25acres but it's work in progress and a legacy for someone in the future to develop further. I have always only felt a custodian of this garden and try to preserve it's beautiful, magical character.
Profile Photo
gonewest
As far as gardening goes we've gone from London postage stamp to a fairly large (but not huge) mature country garden. We are lucky enough to have a river at the bottom of the garden which means the ground is never parched. Of course in years like the past two (2011/2012) it can mean that it bursts its banks once in a while, but we are fortunate that it's never too bad for us. We also have a very mature weeping willow tree and an alder down by the river, and there are more similar on the opposite bank which drink up the excess water very fast so it comes and goes within a few hours. We have a range of wildlife visiting the garden, lots of birds which we love to watch and feed. We get considerably more variety of garden birds than we did in London, but these are added to by a few birds of prey, and of course the water birds from the river. We also have water voles courtesy of the river sometimes, but field voles are another thing - not so welcome as they ruin Mr G's lawn. Now we're not after a bowling green as such, but nor do we want the obvious runs and tunnels shapes appearing in different areas as we gradually move them around. We also see deer in the garden - muntjac and roe who are both even more noticeable in autumn when they want the apples from the two large trees we have. We are separated from our neighbours by mature mainly native trees and shrubs which give us our privacy, make the garden a little haven for us, and feed the birds and the bees. I've been doing my best to add to these as time goes on. 'Course I've gone and added a hazel, and after moaning about the field voles I go and encourage squirrels, but live and let live I suppose. There was nowhere set aside for growing vegetables but our patio is large and surrounds the house on 3 sides so one side has been given over to a couple of raised beds. I'm not a great expert, so I concentrate on things that are easy to grow but expensive in the shops like runner beans and strawberries, with a few other little treats thrown in. I've also added a few patio fruit trees on the same basis. I love summer fruits so have a little apricot called Alfred, two cherries - one dessert, one cooking, and a quince having been introduced to them since we moved here, such a special fruit. They are all only babies yet, though the cherries look as though they'll reward me straight away. The garden also has a mature grapevine which has been a steep curve learning to look after it. I made raisins from it a couple of years ago before the "great rains" that stopped pollinators in their tracks. I also like to grow some herbs too, some good basic ones like rosemary and sage, chives, mint etc, plus a few more like hyssop and savory. And something associated to this line, I have discovered scented pelargoniums. At first I had to buy new each year, but from gratefully received members' info on the Dear Departed, and after a couple of mishaps I learned how to overwinter. The first year I wrapped and covered with bubble wrap in my cold greenhouse. ERROR! Botrytis. The next year I decided to keep them indoors in the porch and the spare bedroom. Worked a lot better, saved some, but should have cut others back a bit further to reduce the amount of growth the dormant plants had to support. Still a bit scaredy cat about cutting back, however this last year all of them survived, plus some cuttings taken for insurance. I'm no expert on anything, but I love this little community of ours and with a bit of trial and error, plus information from our more experienced and even expert members I will and do make progress.
Growing Fruit

Growing tips for cultivating all types of fruit.

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mickyp
veg , fruit & gladioli , plus an avid composter , am all raised beds & i dont dig ,,,,
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Allan
Update March 2017 I have been without my plot for two years now but still have the urge to grow things.  So my back garden gets all my attention now, It seems strange not starting onions off on Boxing Day, I still grow leeks, but not for show anymore. There are six raised beds in all. One for my runner beans, which the soil gets changed in every year. One for peas and broad beans, another for leeks, shallots and parsley. The biggest one then is for my chrysanths. The shaded one has a collection of herbs, Three blueberry bushes, a thornless blackberry, and a goji berry bush, trimmed down too one stem. The narrow side of the garden has a Victoria plum, numerous shrubs, and a collection of hardy fuchsias. This year it will be under planted with loads of bedding plants, that I started off in February. Between that, my fishing and metal detecting  I have enough to keep me busy.
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dandlyon
First went on allotment at the age of five when I had a small piece of my grandfathers plot have grown vegatables ever since.Love to enter our borough allotment competition and have the bug for exhibiting .Enjoy visiting other allotment sites and enjoy the big shows. Mainly a vegetable grower but have been talked into giving flowers a go this year
Growing Gardeners

To encourage young people in gardening through gardening groups, schools or in private gardens and allotments.

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mickyp
veg , fruit & gladioli , plus an avid composter , am all raised beds & i dont dig ,,,,
Growing Vegetables

For seasoned growers and newcomers, both organic and non-organic. Come and share your secrets!

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Allan
Update March 2017 I have been without my plot for two years now but still have the urge to grow things.  So my back garden gets all my attention now, It seems strange not starting onions off on Boxing Day, I still grow leeks, but not for show anymore. There are six raised beds in all. One for my runner beans, which the soil gets changed in every year. One for peas and broad beans, another for leeks, shallots and parsley. The biggest one then is for my chrysanths. The shaded one has a collection of herbs, Three blueberry bushes, a thornless blackberry, and a goji berry bush, trimmed down too one stem. The narrow side of the garden has a Victoria plum, numerous shrubs, and a collection of hardy fuchsias. This year it will be under planted with loads of bedding plants, that I started off in February. Between that, my fishing and metal detecting  I have enough to keep me busy.
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cradleymike
We are lucky to own an allotment, we grow a great deal of our own veg and a little fruit. We are also members of the Colley Gate gardening club.
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dandlyon
First went on allotment at the age of five when I had a small piece of my grandfathers plot have grown vegatables ever since.Love to enter our borough allotment competition and have the bug for exhibiting .Enjoy visiting other allotment sites and enjoy the big shows. Mainly a vegetable grower but have been talked into giving flowers a go this year
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mickyp
veg , fruit & gladioli , plus an avid composter , am all raised beds & i dont dig ,,,,
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Walt

raggedjack hasn't written anything here yet. :)

House Plants

For all those with a particular interest in growing house plants

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VegVamp
Got back into growing veg, fruit, herbs in 2008, after I moved home in 2001 and finally had a garden big enough again to put in a veg plot. Now in year 6 of my veg growing and we are more or less self sufficient in potatoes, veg and some fruit! Love it!
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Allan
Update March 2017 I have been without my plot for two years now but still have the urge to grow things.  So my back garden gets all my attention now, It seems strange not starting onions off on Boxing Day, I still grow leeks, but not for show anymore. There are six raised beds in all. One for my runner beans, which the soil gets changed in every year. One for peas and broad beans, another for leeks, shallots and parsley. The biggest one then is for my chrysanths. The shaded one has a collection of herbs, Three blueberry bushes, a thornless blackberry, and a goji berry bush, trimmed down too one stem. The narrow side of the garden has a Victoria plum, numerous shrubs, and a collection of hardy fuchsias. This year it will be under planted with loads of bedding plants, that I started off in February. Between that, my fishing and metal detecting  I have enough to keep me busy.
Leek and Carrot Competition

For those growing MickyP's Leek and Allan's Carrot seeds. Share your progress, ask questions, post photos, whatever you want!

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karenp

karenp hasn't written anything here yet. :)

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Allan
Update March 2017 I have been without my plot for two years now but still have the urge to grow things.  So my back garden gets all my attention now, It seems strange not starting onions off on Boxing Day, I still grow leeks, but not for show anymore. There are six raised beds in all. One for my runner beans, which the soil gets changed in every year. One for peas and broad beans, another for leeks, shallots and parsley. The biggest one then is for my chrysanths. The shaded one has a collection of herbs, Three blueberry bushes, a thornless blackberry, and a goji berry bush, trimmed down too one stem. The narrow side of the garden has a Victoria plum, numerous shrubs, and a collection of hardy fuchsias. This year it will be under planted with loads of bedding plants, that I started off in February. Between that, my fishing and metal detecting  I have enough to keep me busy.
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mickyp
veg , fruit & gladioli , plus an avid composter , am all raised beds & i dont dig ,,,,
Organic Growing

For all those committed to or interested in growing organically.

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shedsue

shedsue hasn't written anything here yet. :)

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Jenn

Jenn hasn't written anything here yet. :)

Photography

For all things photographic! Hints, tips, cameras, whatever is wanted!

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Hayley
I am a keen vegetable and flower gardener using organic techniques as much as possible. Having moved to the country, and discovered the abundant wildlife in my garden, I am finding ways to work alongside all the animals and insects here. My vegetable garden at present is a small north facing area adjacent to the house which has been quite successful. The soil generally is heavy clay which, over the years, has been improved with organic matter. I have created a fruit orchard with a flower meadow running through it and I need to decide how best to help the natural pond restore it's vigour. Ducks and Moorhens are regular visitors as is the inevitable duck weed! There is still much to do in this 2.25acres but it's work in progress and a legacy for someone in the future to develop further. I have always only felt a custodian of this garden and try to preserve it's beautiful, magical character.
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shedsue

shedsue hasn't written anything here yet. :)

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Allan
Update March 2017 I have been without my plot for two years now but still have the urge to grow things.  So my back garden gets all my attention now, It seems strange not starting onions off on Boxing Day, I still grow leeks, but not for show anymore. There are six raised beds in all. One for my runner beans, which the soil gets changed in every year. One for peas and broad beans, another for leeks, shallots and parsley. The biggest one then is for my chrysanths. The shaded one has a collection of herbs, Three blueberry bushes, a thornless blackberry, and a goji berry bush, trimmed down too one stem. The narrow side of the garden has a Victoria plum, numerous shrubs, and a collection of hardy fuchsias. This year it will be under planted with loads of bedding plants, that I started off in February. Between that, my fishing and metal detecting  I have enough to keep me busy.
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Bill

Bill41 hasn't written anything here yet. :)

Planters Poetry

Poetry for all planters and growers.

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Daffy Gardener
Living in the high Wolds of the Cotswolds & have done for over 10 years now. My garden is, save for a handful of hedging trees and a large bramley, growing from scratch. My blank canvas was grass and an island bed. It is now stuffed full with a maturing mixture of herbacous and evergreen, bulbs, roses and conifers. Yes, I know conifers are not very fashionable, but for winter structure and form they do quite a good job. As its Cotswold limestone, Rhodo's and camillias, blue berry's etc are generally a hiding to nothing unless potted. I'm hoping the Honeyberry will give me some fruit this year. This place can have its own weather and its a bit of a frost pocket sometimes.
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cilla
When we came here 6 years ago there wasn't much in the garden and we have added more flower beds, a pond, a greenhouse and summerhouse and a vegetable area.
Poultry Keeping

Many gardeners keep hens, ducks or geese so join in and share your experience and knowledge or learn more if you are interested in becoming a "Poultry" owner!

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karenp

karenp hasn't written anything here yet. :)

Raised Bed Gardening

Using the "raised beds" method to grow in a garden or allotment. Share what you know or get help if you want to start!

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mickyp
veg , fruit & gladioli , plus an avid composter , am all raised beds & i dont dig ,,,,
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Allan
Update March 2017 I have been without my plot for two years now but still have the urge to grow things.  So my back garden gets all my attention now, It seems strange not starting onions off on Boxing Day, I still grow leeks, but not for show anymore. There are six raised beds in all. One for my runner beans, which the soil gets changed in every year. One for peas and broad beans, another for leeks, shallots and parsley. The biggest one then is for my chrysanths. The shaded one has a collection of herbs, Three blueberry bushes, a thornless blackberry, and a goji berry bush, trimmed down too one stem. The narrow side of the garden has a Victoria plum, numerous shrubs, and a collection of hardy fuchsias. This year it will be under planted with loads of bedding plants, that I started off in February. Between that, my fishing and metal detecting  I have enough to keep me busy.
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Hayley
I am a keen vegetable and flower gardener using organic techniques as much as possible. Having moved to the country, and discovered the abundant wildlife in my garden, I am finding ways to work alongside all the animals and insects here. My vegetable garden at present is a small north facing area adjacent to the house which has been quite successful. The soil generally is heavy clay which, over the years, has been improved with organic matter. I have created a fruit orchard with a flower meadow running through it and I need to decide how best to help the natural pond restore it's vigour. Ducks and Moorhens are regular visitors as is the inevitable duck weed! There is still much to do in this 2.25acres but it's work in progress and a legacy for someone in the future to develop further. I have always only felt a custodian of this garden and try to preserve it's beautiful, magical character.
Recipes

Recipes, recipe requests and what to do with all that lovely home grown food!

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gonewest
As far as gardening goes we've gone from London postage stamp to a fairly large (but not huge) mature country garden. We are lucky enough to have a river at the bottom of the garden which means the ground is never parched. Of course in years like the past two (2011/2012) it can mean that it bursts its banks once in a while, but we are fortunate that it's never too bad for us. We also have a very mature weeping willow tree and an alder down by the river, and there are more similar on the opposite bank which drink up the excess water very fast so it comes and goes within a few hours. We have a range of wildlife visiting the garden, lots of birds which we love to watch and feed. We get considerably more variety of garden birds than we did in London, but these are added to by a few birds of prey, and of course the water birds from the river. We also have water voles courtesy of the river sometimes, but field voles are another thing - not so welcome as they ruin Mr G's lawn. Now we're not after a bowling green as such, but nor do we want the obvious runs and tunnels shapes appearing in different areas as we gradually move them around. We also see deer in the garden - muntjac and roe who are both even more noticeable in autumn when they want the apples from the two large trees we have. We are separated from our neighbours by mature mainly native trees and shrubs which give us our privacy, make the garden a little haven for us, and feed the birds and the bees. I've been doing my best to add to these as time goes on. 'Course I've gone and added a hazel, and after moaning about the field voles I go and encourage squirrels, but live and let live I suppose. There was nowhere set aside for growing vegetables but our patio is large and surrounds the house on 3 sides so one side has been given over to a couple of raised beds. I'm not a great expert, so I concentrate on things that are easy to grow but expensive in the shops like runner beans and strawberries, with a few other little treats thrown in. I've also added a few patio fruit trees on the same basis. I love summer fruits so have a little apricot called Alfred, two cherries - one dessert, one cooking, and a quince having been introduced to them since we moved here, such a special fruit. They are all only babies yet, though the cherries look as though they'll reward me straight away. The garden also has a mature grapevine which has been a steep curve learning to look after it. I made raisins from it a couple of years ago before the "great rains" that stopped pollinators in their tracks. I also like to grow some herbs too, some good basic ones like rosemary and sage, chives, mint etc, plus a few more like hyssop and savory. And something associated to this line, I have discovered scented pelargoniums. At first I had to buy new each year, but from gratefully received members' info on the Dear Departed, and after a couple of mishaps I learned how to overwinter. The first year I wrapped and covered with bubble wrap in my cold greenhouse. ERROR! Botrytis. The next year I decided to keep them indoors in the porch and the spare bedroom. Worked a lot better, saved some, but should have cut others back a bit further to reduce the amount of growth the dormant plants had to support. Still a bit scaredy cat about cutting back, however this last year all of them survived, plus some cuttings taken for insurance. I'm no expert on anything, but I love this little community of ours and with a bit of trial and error, plus information from our more experienced and even expert members I will and do make progress.
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mickyp
veg , fruit & gladioli , plus an avid composter , am all raised beds & i dont dig ,,,,
Savvy Savers

All about saving, scrimping, reusing and recycling, in the garden and in the home!

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Victoriam4074

Victoriam4074 hasn't written anything here yet. :)

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Beanstew
I am really interested in all aspects of gardening, with a particular love of propagation. This would be fine, but space is finite where I live now, and I am seriously considering some vertical gardening. My garden is mixed - I have trees, shrubs and herbacious planting, with an area for vegetables and fruit which is never big enough. Earlier in life, I grew enough for a family of five to be self-sufficient all year round in vegetables and fruit, and sometimes feel sad that this is no longer necessary. Changing weather patterns mean I am revising what I grow, and how I grow it - but that is part of the skill of being a gardener - ducking and diving to counteract adversity.
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shedsue

shedsue hasn't written anything here yet. :)

Tony’s Tips

Gardening Tips from Tony, and from anyone else that wants to add their own special tips. Please add them as individual topics in the forum and give them a descriptive name to make finding them again easier.

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dandlyon
First went on allotment at the age of five when I had a small piece of my grandfathers plot have grown vegatables ever since.Love to enter our borough allotment competition and have the bug for exhibiting .Enjoy visiting other allotment sites and enjoy the big shows. Mainly a vegetable grower but have been talked into giving flowers a go this year
Water gardens

Water features and ponds

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Hayley
I am a keen vegetable and flower gardener using organic techniques as much as possible. Having moved to the country, and discovered the abundant wildlife in my garden, I am finding ways to work alongside all the animals and insects here. My vegetable garden at present is a small north facing area adjacent to the house which has been quite successful. The soil generally is heavy clay which, over the years, has been improved with organic matter. I have created a fruit orchard with a flower meadow running through it and I need to decide how best to help the natural pond restore it's vigour. Ducks and Moorhens are regular visitors as is the inevitable duck weed! There is still much to do in this 2.25acres but it's work in progress and a legacy for someone in the future to develop further. I have always only felt a custodian of this garden and try to preserve it's beautiful, magical character.
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Allan
Update March 2017 I have been without my plot for two years now but still have the urge to grow things.  So my back garden gets all my attention now, It seems strange not starting onions off on Boxing Day, I still grow leeks, but not for show anymore. There are six raised beds in all. One for my runner beans, which the soil gets changed in every year. One for peas and broad beans, another for leeks, shallots and parsley. The biggest one then is for my chrysanths. The shaded one has a collection of herbs, Three blueberry bushes, a thornless blackberry, and a goji berry bush, trimmed down too one stem. The narrow side of the garden has a Victoria plum, numerous shrubs, and a collection of hardy fuchsias. This year it will be under planted with loads of bedding plants, that I started off in February. Between that, my fishing and metal detecting  I have enough to keep me busy.
We Dig Books

Clickers’ recommendations – feel free to browse!

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NorthernTeacher
Got my house and garden March 2011 and always learning. Love it. I call it my little copse as there are lots of trees and lots of wildlife. Space for some veg in the garden and in some purpose built raised beds. The thrushes help themselves to the slugs and snails here! And now it's 2015 and I have a pond!!
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